Book Gift Guide: Irish Authors Part 1

Forgive me for going all out patriotic but well…with the quality of writing that was released by Irish authors this year, they really needed their own posts. You can find my first gift guide that focused on some amazing cookbooks here!

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I have read some of these books but the majority are going onto my wishlist and into the stockings of family and friends!

The Gospel According to Blindboy

The Gospel According to Blindboy is a collection of surreal parody and thought-provoking short stories. One half of the Rubberbandits, through various interviews and social media posts Blindboy has shown himself to be a critical thinker and a voice for the youth of Ireland, targeting mental health, the patriarchy and the hypocrisy of the status quo. Trust Ireland to need a young man with a plastic bag over his head to make a point! This book has garnered amazing reviews from some of the best authors Ireland has to offer, claiming it to be a wonderful yet twisted reflection of the Ireland of today. I’m definitely picking this up for my boyfriend, although I think it’s suitable for anyone who loves that macabre surrealism that Blindboy does so well.

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For fans of thrillers Cat Hogan has written There Was A Crooked Man is a wonderfully tense follow-up to her first novel They All Fall Down. It’s a wild ride into the mind of a psychopath running a vicious crime ring, who is hellbent on revenge, whatever the cost. Evocative writing brings you on a journey from the streets of Marrakesh to the winding alleys of Dublin, and keeps you reading until the very last page! My sister is going to love this duo of books, I think I’ll give to her on Christmas eve to keep her entertained until Santa comes!

The Woman at 72 Derry Lane

Reminiscent of Maeve Binchy this is a really heart-wrenching book examining relationships, friendships and how we can create jails for ourselves that are difficult to escape from without help. A seemingly crazy neighbour might be the friend that the narrator needs to help rescue her from her apparently wonderful life…The Woman at 72 Derry Lane is a wonderful tale that you won’t forget in a hurry. My partners mom is a huge Binchy fan so I’m looking forward to gifting her this!

The Heart's Invisible Furies

John Boyne is well-known for his heartfelt stories but this may be the most beautiful yet. An adopted man tries to figure out his place in the world; from Ireland in the 1940s to present day it we follow Cyril as he lives his extraordinarily ordinary life and all the trials and tribulations that come from not quite knowing where you fit in. Funny, sad and everything in between this novel is just sheer perfection. The Heart’s Invisible Furies is sure to find a way into the heart of whomever you gift this to this year.

Atlas of the Irish Revolution

This next one is a bit of a chunkster…weighing in at 5kg it’s a tome of epic proportions! The Atlas of the Irish Revolution is a non-fiction book chronicling Irish history in beautiful detail. It boasts of over 300 detailed maps and over 120 scholars have submitted work from a range of disciplines to give a well-rounded look at the formation of the Irish republic, from home rule in 1912 to the end of the civil war in 1923. This is a genuine showstopper of a gift, and the price is really reasonable considering the breath, scope and ample size of this book!

Oh My God What a Complete Aisling The Novel

If you’re after something quintessentially Irish then Oh My God What a Complete Aisling is the very thing. The tale of a culchie girl making her way through the big shmoke and all that being a sensible country girl in the city entails. Covering the essential long earrings and jersey combo (that can take you from work to a night out and inevitably coppers), and the worries about Daddy and the farm at home, it delves into the responses  you get when you dare to change your life and challenge everyones expectations. There are some really poignant scenes in this book that really hits home, you’ll be a mess of tears (deffo stock up on the tissues), there’s more where you’ll be laughing yourself silly and in the end you’ll find the bit of Aisling that’s inside us all. Getting this for several friends this Crimbo and I know they won’t be disappointed!

A Line Made By WalkingSara Baume is one of my favourite authors and her second book A Line Made By Walking totally lives up to the standard she set with Spill Simmer Falter Wither. Exploring the fragility of our existence and our grip on nature, art and the meaning of our lives through an unexpected medium: the photography of dead animals. Seeking internal peace means having to come face to face with our inner struggles and demons and in this story Frankie is no exception. If you have ever had feelings of depression, anxiety and just generally being overwhelmed in a world where you struggle to find a niche and a happy medium between everything that is expected of you…this is the book for you.

Life After Life

A memoir by an Irish man wrongfully convicted of an act of terrorism in 1970s London who spent 15 years behind bars in a horrific miscarriage of justice. Paddy Armstrongs Life after Life brings you into his world and the terrifying reality of having your freedom wrongfully denied to you and the hardships of living in the aftermath of such injustice. This is a traumatic but an utterly powerful read and I think many English and Irish people would get a lot out of this book.

In White Ink

A series of eleven short stories In White Ink centres around parenthood, marriage, sensuality, perversion and sexual violence. This book isn’t for everyone but for those that like dark and twisted tales this is the collection for you. There’s so many diverse characters and they all have a story to share that hits you hard and makes you really consider what matters in life.  I’ll pick two that illustrate the mix of stories on offer; one tale centres around a wife coming to terms with the signs that were apparent during their honeymoon about her husbands paedophilia, while another story focuses on a bereaved father at the wedding of his late daughters friend. (I told you they were hard hitters!)

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A fictional biography of Stan Laurel of Laurel & Hardy fame, He recreates Hollywood of old and the entirety of Laurels life. It’s totally engrossing, looking at the various loves, losses, comedy career and iconic partnership, all served up in short easy to read chapters (some more like flash fiction). John Connolly has done his research and really brings you on a journey to the dizzying heights of fame and the quick descent into obscurity, through the great joys and the hardship and pain that people experience throughout life. This book would make a wonderful gift for the person you don’t know what to get as it’s a wholly unexpected ride from beginning to end,

 

Let me know if you’re planning on picking any of these books up and if you’ve already enjoyed (or hated!) any on this list!

 

 

*cliffs of moher creative commons image courtesy of Malte Baumann

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Book Gift Guide: Cookbooks

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I love to cook, so it seemed just right to start off this book guide with some of my top picks to give as gifts! Now there is a slight bias, as I am a vegetarian of many years, but I’m sure you’ll forgive me once you see the absolutely beautiful recipes inside each of these books! I’m also going to include honorable mentions, as some books I had loaned to my mom and sister for christmas dinner ideas!

The World of the Happy Pear

The World of the Happy Pear is the second vegetarian cookbook by the Flynn twins, they’re two of the most enthusiastic and cheerful people on the planet (I’m not joking, check out their youtube channel and instagram for proof!)  and they share some of the most popular recipes from their award winning cafe! They cover hearty soups, chillis, beautiful desserts and lively salads, you really cannot go wrong giving this is a gift. Their first book simply titled The Happy Pear is a kitchen staple at my house, even the pickiest of eaters can find something they’ll enjoy!

Soup for Every Day

Calling all soup lovers! This is such an interesting cookbook, it’s a real chunkster with 365 recipes for soup between the covers! It has a really interesting mix of traditional, exotic and experimental soups. A Soup For Every Day is a great investment for someone who really likes to make simple but hearty meals, and it has a great mix between meat and veggie based (and some surprisingly chocolate based!) soups.

If someone you know has a slow cooker/crock pot but they’re not quite sure what to cook with it, this is the book for them! I picked up The Slow Cooker Solution in a small local newsagents with a tiny rack of books, and online I could only find it second hand, but it’s very cheap and a wonderful stocking filler for someone who needs some slow cooker inspiration! It’s heavily meat based, (but as usual it’s easy to veggie up a meat recipe) and has a good few slow cooker desserts, which are really fun to try!

Everyday Super Food

Jamie Oliver is a household name, and with several tv shows, worldwide health initives and a multitude of cookbooks it’s not hard to understand! Everyday Superfood isn’t his most recent (that would be 5-ingredient meals) but it’s one of my favourites. It’s got some really delicious recipes for smoothies and some really interesting dinner ideas. I would suggest this as a good all rounder for someone who is interested in eating better but doesn’t want to take the plunge into a huge lifestyle change like vegetarianism or veganism.

VeganomiconIsa Chandre Moskowitz is a legend in the vegan cooking world, she is the brain behind ppk (post punk kitchen) and has released so many AMAZING vegan cookbooks. this one is the biggest and best investment for any vegan looking to expand their cooking repertoire. Veganomicon has the most amazing pie recipes, dessert recipes, cheese sauces, beautiful hearty curries and ways of spicing up the simple potato that will blow your tastebuds! Non-vegans will get just as much out of this book as vegans and vegetarians, as it’s just so chockablock with beautiful and tasty food ideas, they definitely won’t miss the meat!

A Modern Way to Eat

A Modern Way To Eat is quite simply stunning. Simple but intriguing recipes with fruit and veg, it’s really surprising how much variety you can achieve with simple core ingredients! This was Anna Jones first cookbook and I honestly use this every week, the recipes are simple yet really tasty and she always has great substitution advice. If your giftee already has this cookbook her other books A Modern Way To Cook and The Modern Cooks Year are both equally as stunning!

My honorable mentions go to:

Thug Kitchen

The Thug Kitchen isn’t afraid to tell it like it is, with a mouth like a sailor and a kick-ass attitude, they really want you to eat some f**king vegetables, and to make them delicious while you do it! Their dumpling and chickpea stew is absolutly DIVINE and I highly highly recommend it to one and all!

Recipes for a Nervous Breakdown

Sophie Whites Recipes for a Nervous Breakdown is part autobiography and part cookbook and it really explores how food and eating well helps put us back together. I haven’t cooked anything from this yet, but I can tell you that everything looks phenomenal!

I hope you were inspired by this group of exciting cookbooks, please let me know what your favourite cookbooks have been and help me explore some more of the world of food! 🙂

My Absolute Darling : Gabriel Tallent

This book quickly worked its way into my best reads of 2017, it’s got everything I love; twisted dark family dynamics, a compelling story, well paced and beautiful writing.

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My Absolute Darling follows Turtle a young teenage girl living with her daddy, the man whom she both adores and hates (with good reason). She understands that she’s the thing he loves most in the world. She is petrified by his presence yet she craves his attention, perhaps because it’s all she has. He’s taught her how to use all the guns in their sparse and ‘rough and ready’ home, all the better to face the impending doom facing society. Change is coming however, Turtle is about to connect with people outside the family and make friends…

I really love how Tallent has written this novel, the coarseness of the language used by Turtle and her father was the ideal contrast to the beautiful lyrical descriptions of the environment in which they live. It is such a powerful way of dragging you into the story, you really get a feel for the harshness of the world that surrounds Turtle. The world she inhabits with her daddy is dilapidated and sparse, militaristic, strict and distinctly lacking in home comforts, while the area in which she lives is filled with luscious plant life and beautiful land and seascapes, both rugged and beautiful.

It’s little wonder that Turtle is fascinated by the flowery language that her friends wax lyrical, they care about things like literature and movies, things that Turtle hadn’t even considered to matter before making their acquaintance. She likes to look after objects, but the moment her daddy feels she likes something more than he thinks she should, he sets about to destroy it, and her, wholly.

There are scenes of base depravity and horrific abuse in this book, but it doesn’t reduce Turtle to a one note victim, she is a complex character with conflicting and confusing emotions. She only knows this life, but is smart enough to know it’s not a regular upbringing, she doesn’t know how to feel about it and she struggles to hide it from those around her. She’s fiercely loyal to her daddy and her grandfather, and you see how dysfunctional families can still function somewhat normally. You really feel like you’re there with her, struggling to know yourself and your feelings; bouncing between self hatred and internalised sexism, between being the bully and being the hero. Simultaneously you’ll be absolutely disgusted and angered by the events that unfold and root with all your heart for Turtle.

I felt like this book looked at how misogyny can corrupt and twist a person into a hateful husk of a human. Within the first few chapters you see how much hostility there is towards not only women but any outsider and how this has shrunk the world around Turtle. This atmosphere of distrust puts you constantly on edge, there’s a permeating feeling of unease and you can feel an unspoken threat hanging over you throughout your reading.

The uneasy feeling only helps to heighten the tension that the constant presence of guns and weapons creates. It feels to me that the gun culture in America fetishises not only the guns themselves, but the power that wielding a gun gives you. The fact that guns are so freely and readily obtained by someone who readily admits to being a survivalist with a strong distrust for society should have sent alarms bells ringing in some quarters, but not so in this novel. This approach appears to be par for the course in some parts of the states, and maybe this book in its own way is saying we should question why this is so.

There are of course some small criticisms, in places Tallent can be overly descriptive to the detraction of the story itself, and some of the support characters are very two dimensional. The friends she makes are too perfect, their prose too polished and their personalities very vaguely fleshed out. The teacher is the worst character in my opinion, she’s just simply good, sporty and concerned, I couldn’t connect to her at all because there wasn’t much to connect to. The only other criticism I can level is that the final scenes were highly dramatic but a bit drawn out, I felt like in places it was written more for cinematographic effect than to further the story.

However I loved the actual ending, you leave on an unresolved and unsettled note. wanting to know more, which isn’t a bad way to leave a book at all!

4.5/5

Childhood Bookworm Nostalgia Trip #1

Growing up as a culchie child in 90’s Ireland meant only having two television channels, one family tv, and no friends living nearby; I mean books became the obvious pastime! I used to stay up late hiding under my duvet with a mini torch (that for some reason 90’s kids magazines often gave away as freebies? Anyone else remember that? My favourite was my green Scooby Doo one.) reading my book until my mom would catch me around 1am…

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I have a hell of a lot of nostalgia for the books I read as a child, and I can really remember vividly the plots and characters from many of them! I reckon everyone has similar powerful memories about childhood books that have stuck with them, so I figured why not try to start a book tag! #CBNT

I’m going to share some of my favourite childhood books (and the covers of the versions that I read) that bring me wonderful nostalgia, hopefully some of you have read the same books and this too brings back some marvellous memories!

I haven’t read any of these books since I was a child so these are just what I remember, and my impressions may have been incorrect, but these are the thoughts I associate with these titles. I’m going to focus on books I read before the age of 13, and maybe write another series about books that teenage me read and loved!

zforzacariah

A book that I adored but that scared me was Z for Zachariah. It’s a story about a 16-year-old girl who is the sole survivor of a nuclear war, or so she thinks. It was the first book that I read that was based in a post-apocalyptic world and it definitely made an impression on my young mind! The threat from the outsider, not only because he was an outsider but also because he was a man is something that sticks out in my memory. I remember feeling worried for her at the ending of the book too! (And it features a dog!)

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Sisters…no way! Was one of my favourite books to read when I was 10 or so because it was double-sided! One side was a punky girls diary, she had lost her mother and she was coming to terms with that huge loss (I have a very clear memory of reading a line about her dad weeping in the garden while leaning against his spade, and the character thinking of going out to weep and hug him and thinking about how dramatic and poetic the image would be). Her dad starts to date again, and the woman he goes out with has two daughters, one who is the same age as the punky girl, however she’s her polar opposite. The other girl is into ballet and cares about her younger sister and has a boyfriend who she broke up with (magnums remind her of him), she’s a gentle soul and she likes eating sistersnoway2digestives that crumble at the top of the packet!
The flip side of the book is this ballet girls diary, and you see that she too had problems adjusting to her mother dating etc.  I think this book drove home to me that there’s always at least two sides to every argument…and that books are cooler when they’re double-sided.

the-chocolate-war

The Chocolate War was one of those mind-blowing books that I read when I was 11 or 12, and it made me think about challenging society and whats expected of me. As far as I can remember the book centres around a new boy in a school who refuses to sell chocolates for a fund-raiser and the religious brother and the school bully (in charge of a gang that runs things in the school as far as I remember!) who is his right hand man start an intimidation campaign that ends up in an incredibly violent organised fight.

stargirl

Stargirl was another book that had a message of staying true to yourself, no matter the consequences. The book was from the point of view of a shy boy who collected porcupine neckties, and how he fell in love with a most unusual girl. He convinces her to try and fit in, and she does for a while as far as I remember, but she hated being “normal” so went back to her hippie ways, and he talks about the lasting impression she made on the school – where they always cheer for the other teams first score in a match etc. My main memory is the description of the yellow gown and sunflowered bike that stargirl attends prom alone in! I do remember that for a while after reading this book I wanted to bring a little flowerpot to school with me, but thankfully my mother talked me out of that one! (I was an already clumsy 11 year old, adding glass to the mixture was an unecessary hazard!)

thewishlist

The Wish List was one of my absolutely favourite books, I really adored it! The main character, Meg dies in the first chapter during a botched burglary of an old man. The problem of where to send her soul arises from her balanced books, she’s done as many good as bad things in her life. She gets back to earth (with the help of a little imp who cleans the walls of the pathway to heaven and hell) and helps the pensioner she was going to rob to achieve some of his life goals, or his wish list. She also gets revenge on her abusive stepfather and ultimately carries out an act of forgiveness. (There was also a fused spirit of a pit bull and a guy who was trying to control Meg that satan sends back to earth to try to get her spirit to go to hell…) It was such a fast faced and wonderful read, I really must go back and give it a reread!

run-with-the-wind

I love foxes, and this is probably in no small part due to Tom McCaughren. I adored his fox series, I had the whole collection and I have strong memories of crying bitterly about the deaths that occurred. It’s a strong possibility that these books starting with Run with the Wind and the animals of farthing wood helped to convince me, at least subconsciously, to become a vegetarian! Sage Bush a blind fox is helping a group of foxes find safety from fur hunters and the secret to survival. I read this series before I read watership down and I think they had very similar themes for certain, but I loved both as I was (and still am!) a huge animal lover.

thelongmarch

Probably my first exposure to Native Americans and Native American culture was this book, The Long March. A young native boy is being convinced by the elder (his grandmother if I remember correctly!) of his village to donate what they can to help the starving people of Ireland. He is confused because 20 years earlier it was white people who forced his tribe to undergo the long march, and to leave their lands in Mississippi. I remember the story mentioning that the ground was frozen too hard to bury the many who died on the long march, so they put the corpses up trees. It also mentioned the dying Irish who had their mouths stained green from attempts to eat grass. It’s based on a real event that happened during the Irish potato famine, where the native Chocktaws donated a huge amount to help the people of Ireland. I think I felt very humbled by reading this book- I had up to that point always seen Irish people as the saviours and the more advanced, and this had given me a very new perspective. I remember too feeling so enraged and angry at the forced migration of the Choctaw people, it has definitely lead to an interest in native American history and culture that persists to this day.

bluehorse

Marita Conlon-McKenna wrote most of my childhood I’m pretty sure! I loved all of her books, but this book, The Blue Horse has a special place in my heart. It’s about the racism experienced by a young girl from the travelling community when she is forced into a settled person house. The outrage I felt for this little girl (I think she must have been the same age as me at the time), when a hairdresser refuses to cut her hair, claiming that all travellers have lice, it actually broke my heart to think that people were treated so badly for no good reason. I think it was my first glimpse into racism and injustices in Irish society and man did it affect me!

machine-gunners

The Machine Gunners was surprisingly enough about a machine gun… A young English boy who collects shrapnel finds a downed German plane with a working machine gun, himself and his friends decide to take this and build a fort which to defend their homes from the Germans. The kids shoot down a German plane and capture the rear gunner, who repairs their machine gun in exchange for a rowboat if I remember correctly! One of the boys family home is bombed and only he survives, and he lives in the fort from then on, the German soldier returns because he hasn’t the strength to row to Norway (I think! This is one of those details I’ve probably remembered incorrectly!) and eventually the fort is found by soldiers and after a gun battle the children and German are captured, two of the children go to a childrens home and the soldier is held as a POW. I remember having nightmares about my family home being detroyed by bombs after reading this book. (Although why anyone would bomb a fairly remote house in rural Ireland never occured to me…) I also harboured worries about my dad being forced to become a soldier until I asked my mom and learned that Ireland is neutral!

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Nuala & her Secret Wolf was my first foray into the Drumshee series, a series of books that are all based in the same place but in different time periods. This book was based in the Iron Age I think, and the girl hides the fact that she is mothering an abandoned wolf cub, who goes on to save her life. I loved this series as a kid, there was a viking based book, a famine book and many many more besides. I don’t think I finished the series as I “outgrew” it at some point but I’d love to go back and enjoy getting lost in Drumshee again!

I have at least twenty other books I could mention but I think I’ll finish up my first CBNT post with possibly the first book that I remember making a huge impression on me.

hawthorn-tree

Under The Hawthorn Tree is the first of a trilogy written by Marita Conlon-McKenna, that I read when I was nine years old, and they are partly responsible for my love of Irish history. The youngest of four children dies at the start of the potato famine and is buried under the hawthorn tree in their garden.The parents then die and the eldest girl decides to take her two younger siblings and go find their grandaunts who live in a city far away instead of going to the workhouse where they would be separated. They encounter horrors of death in various forms upon their journey and they have several close calls with death themselves. Ultimately the siblings have each other to fight for and the strength of familial bonds is a big part of this story. It’s a very moving book and one that has stuck with me all these years!

What books have stuck with you? Any reasons why?

Keep an eye out for the next CBNT coming soon! 🙂

Closed Casket : Sophie Hannah, Agatha Christie

I’ll start off by admitting that I am an ardent Agatha Christie fan. She has written some of my favourite murder mystery books, and I feel like I’m coming home when I read one of her stories. This book…well it didn’t feel like coming home.

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It’s easy to tell that this wasn’t written by Dame Agatha herself, but it is a close approximation to her writing style, and it’s got a good pace and a nice flow. The character of Poirot isn’t quite right in my opinion, he’s not as concieted and confident (or arrogant as Hastings might say!) and he isn’t as involved as he is in a Christie novel.

The character of Catchpool is a bit odd, I feel that even though he’s the narrator I didn’t get to know him very well. His personality is slightly rounded in his kindness in going to the aid of a crying soul, and his confusion in his dealings with the cook and Poirot, but he felt like an unfinished character, Sophie Hannah gave me some sense of who Catchpool is but for me, he wasn’t fully realised.

I did enjoy the placement of the mystery in town near me, Clonakilty, at the beginning of the Irish Free State, but very little was mentioned of the ongoing civil war (which was quite a big thing around Cork in general). Maybe I’m simply nitpicking as I have an interest in Irish history and love to have historically accurate settings in books.

The setting of the big house and the limited cast of characters is a tried and true Christie device and it works yet again for this mystery. The owner of the house Lady Playford is well depicted and her novels sound like a lot of fun! (On a side note, if Sophie Hannah wanted to write the actual Shrimp Seddon mysteries I would be more than happy to read them!)

I liked the characters of Dorro and Kimpton as they felt the most realistic to me, they both had some backstory, and were presented as flawed but believable humans, they felt significantly more fleshed out than the two dimensional son Harry and the devoted Sophie for instance.

The plot ends up being quite convoluted and a bit stretched in places, but it’s an enjoyable romp all the same. I don’t want to give any of the story away other than the ending was a bit disappointing to me, and the “experiment” that was carried out was -to me- a cheap way of creating a mystery.

Over all I’d give this a rating of 2/5, it was good but far from great. It’s worth reading to be reminded of the joy of an Agatha Christie mystery. As a stand alone book, Closed Casket is fairly good general murder mystery story, but it’s not a wonderful addition to the Christie collection.

I definitely wouldn’t want it to be someones first Poirot, for that I’d recommend The Mysterious Affair at Styles, Murder on the Orient Express, Five Little Pigs or The ABC Murders. Those are some of my favourite Christies and would make excellent Christmas gifts for the uninitiated!

His Bloody Project : Graeme Macrae Burnet

This work reminds me of John B Keane’s masterpiece The Field, a rural community deftly recreated; the mistrust of outsiders, the rivalry with neighbouring towns and communities and an innate sense of us vs them. The story centres around a brutal, repulsive set of murders in a small farming village, carried out by Roderick Macrae.

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The first half of the book is a “memoir” from the accused himself, and the second half is “transcripts of the trial” and “national news coverage” of the sensational crime. I felt that this was an effective way to show Roderick to be either deliberately lying or unintentionally unreliable or misleading in various parts of his narrative, and made me question the validity of his version of events and the subsequent truthfulness of his plea at trial.

The story challenged me to examine what insanity is and if someone who is insane can recognise themselves as such. Is evil an inherent moral flaw, as the minister in the village believes? Is the loss of a positive and loving influence in ones life enough to send one into a spiralling path of depravity and madness? What is soundness of mind, is it something that can be accurately measured and pronounced before the world?

This is part historical fiction mentioning a real pioneer in the field of psychotherapy a Doctor James Tompson. With the inclusion of this character Graeme has brought into play the class differences which were thought to feature heavily in the creation of the “criminal class”. Such beliefs are now outdated and distasteful but are an accurate representation of the society in which this novel is set. There’s an obvious split and mistrust between the local crofters and spalpins and those in positions of power. Both view the other as almost a different species, and in my mind they almost mirror the divide in current day global politics with ‘rural conservatives’ and ‘urban liberals’, both looking at the other group as very “other”.

Burnet has also captured admirably the rather savage and cruel treatment of women in the 1800s, rape is just seen as an inevitable thing that happens, dying in childbirth is framed in terms of dying to atone for the families sins and pregnancy borne of wedlock brings intense shame upon a family. For me it really brings to life the dour, oppressive Presbyterian/religious atmosphere that permeated the rural communities of Britain and Ireland.

The writing flows well and is easy to engage with and absorb, but some of the characters are very two dimensional in my eyes. To name but one the defense attorney Sinclair (although there is a letter from him included in the second half) could have done with more beefing up and in my opinion an exploration of his very ‘modern’ beliefs would have been interesting. My favourite character was Kenny Smoke. He’s a villager and feminist of sorts; a fair man with an innate sense of right and wrong and he stands out as a subtly nuanced and believable character.

I’d give this a 3.5/5 rating, as I certainly enjoyed this and raced through the book, but it lacks a truly gripping protagonist. A lover of true crime and historical fiction could do worse than to wake up to a gift of this from Santa!

Don’t want to be a book collector I want to be a reader!

What a to do! The reasons for blogging my reading journey.

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Reading was my lifeblood for a long time, then somewhere along the line I got caught up in the drudgeries of life and forgot how to enjoy my favourite hobby. I became a book collector rather than a reader, and my aim is to rectify that.
My name is Lany and I am a recovering reader!

a small bookcase with some of the unread collection hanging about

I’ve made a libib account to scan all the unread books in my house and there’s over 500 languishing on shelves scattered around the place. It’s incredibly obscene and is creating a rapidly increasing feeling of guilt for obtaining these publications and not getting around to enjoying them (or not, as the case may be)!

This is an early new year resolution, to try to get at least 70% of the unread list…well, read!
There’s a wide variety to choose from; literary fiction, light reads, murder mystery, sci-fi, fantasy, comedy and non-fiction…certainly have got all the bases covered!

one of many...this one houses a lot of our discworld collection!

Hopefully this blog will be a record of my thoughts and feeling about the various reads and probably some reflections about the collected works of authors or various themes. It would be fun to document my ponderings on books I own, but also on books I borrow from the local library, especially as those are more “transient” books, and I may forget reading them if I don’t keep a record somewhere. Possibly some of my bookish friends will be willing to set pen to paper (as it were) and write a few posts now and then too!
Only time will tell, but I (like Dickens, ho ho!) have great expectations of myself as I set out on this endeavor.

Wish me luck! 🙂