His Bloody Project : Graeme Macrae Burnet

This work reminds me of John B Keane’s masterpiece The Field, a rural community deftly recreated; the mistrust of outsiders, the rivalry with neighbouring towns and communities and an innate sense of us vs them. The story centres around a brutal, repulsive set of murders in a small farming village, carried out by Roderick Macrae.

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The first half of the book is a “memoir” from the accused himself, and the second half is “transcripts of the trial” and “national news coverage” of the sensational crime. I felt that this was an effective way to show Roderick to be either deliberately lying or unintentionally unreliable or misleading in various parts of his narrative, and made me question the validity of his version of events and the subsequent truthfulness of his plea at trial.

The story challenged me to examine what insanity is and if someone who is insane can recognise themselves as such. Is evil an inherent moral flaw, as the minister in the village believes? Is the loss of a positive and loving influence in ones life enough to send one into a spiralling path of depravity and madness? What is soundness of mind, is it something that can be accurately measured and pronounced before the world?

This is part historical fiction mentioning a real pioneer in the field of psychotherapy a Doctor James Tompson. With the inclusion of this character Graeme has brought into play the class differences which were thought to feature heavily in the creation of the “criminal class”. Such beliefs are now outdated and distasteful but are an accurate representation of the society in which this novel is set. There’s an obvious split and mistrust between the local crofters and spalpins and those in positions of power. Both view the other as almost a different species, and in my mind they almost mirror the divide in current day global politics with ‘rural conservatives’ and ‘urban liberals’, both looking at the other group as very “other”.

Burnet has also captured admirably the rather savage and cruel treatment of women in the 1800s, rape is just seen as an inevitable thing that happens, dying in childbirth is framed in terms of dying to atone for the families sins and pregnancy borne of wedlock brings intense shame upon a family. For me it really brings to life the dour, oppressive Presbyterian/religious atmosphere that permeated the rural communities of Britain and Ireland.

The writing flows well and is easy to engage with and absorb, but some of the characters are very two dimensional in my eyes. To name but one the defense attorney Sinclair (although there is a letter from him included in the second half) could have done with more beefing up and in my opinion an exploration of his very ‘modern’ beliefs would have been interesting. My favourite character was Kenny Smoke. He’s a villager and feminist of sorts; a fair man with an innate sense of right and wrong and he stands out as a subtly nuanced and believable character.

I’d give this a 3.5/5 rating, as I certainly enjoyed this and raced through the book, but it lacks a truly gripping protagonist. A lover of true crime and historical fiction could do worse than to wake up to a gift of this from Santa!

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Costa 2016 Shortlist Announced

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The shortlist was announced on November 22nd this year, and it’s an interesting group!
The competition is female dominated, with 14 of the 20 works nominated written by women. This is noteworthy merely because had it been 14 men not a single eyebrow would have been raised.

Thrillingly the novel shortlist features three former winners (Maggie O’Farrell, Rose Tremain and Sebastian Barry) which makes this years competition particularly compelling!

I’ve found myself always really enjoying the books that win, but this year I’ve decided to challenge myself somewhat. I’m going to borrow from my library the four books in the novel shortlist and hopefully, time permitting also will read all four nominated for the first novel prize (and if I succeed then continue to read the poetry shortlist) and give my honest opinion here on the blog before the winners of each category is announced on Jan 3rd.

I’m planning on reading The Essex Serpent first, which I think promises to be a pleasingly gothic victorian tale about a monster terrorising a town.(I coud be wrong I have’t read too much about any of the books so as not to spoil any surprises!) The Gustav Sonata is my second in line, mainly because it’s the one I’m least convinced I’ll enjoy and I’m hoping that the momentum I build up will carry me through it. Hopefully I can then get my hands on This Must Be The Place, I’ve never read any Maggie O’Farrell before but the basic synopsis I’ve read has already got me wanting more, so I’m looking forward to getting stuck into this one. The book with the longest waiting list in my local library is Days Without End so fingers crossed I’ll get to it before the start of January!

Novel Award

Days Without End -Sebastian Barry

This Must Be The Place -Maggie O’Farrell

The Essex Serpent -Sarah Perry

The Gustav Sonata -Rose Tremain

First Novel Award

The Good Guy -Susan Beale

My Name Is Leon -Kit de Waal

The Words In My Hand -Guinevere Glasfurd

Golden Hill -Francis Spufford

Poetry Award

Let Them Eat Chaos -Kate Tempest

Falling Awake -Alice Oswald

Sunshine -Melissa Lee-Houghton

Say Something Back -Denise Riley

Children’s Book Award

Orangeboy -Patrice Lawrence

The Monstrous Child-Francesca Simon

The Bombs That Brought Us Together -Brian Conaghan

 

Time Travelling With A Hamster -Ross Welford

Biography Award

The Return: Fathers, Sons And The Land In Between -Hisham Matar

I’m Not With The Band: A Writer’s Life Lost In Music -Sylvia Patterson

Dadland: A Journey Into Uncharted Territory -Keggie Carew

Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years -John Guy

 

 

Don’t want to be a book collector I want to be a reader!

What a to do! The reasons for blogging my reading journey.

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Reading was my lifeblood for a long time, then somewhere along the line I got caught up in the drudgeries of life and forgot how to enjoy my favourite hobby. I became a book collector rather than a reader, and my aim is to rectify that.
My name is Lany and I am a recovering reader!

a small bookcase with some of the unread collection hanging about

I’ve made a libib account to scan all the unread books in my house and there’s over 500 languishing on shelves scattered around the place. It’s incredibly obscene and is creating a rapidly increasing feeling of guilt for obtaining these publications and not getting around to enjoying them (or not, as the case may be)!

This is an early new year resolution, to try to get at least 70% of the unread list…well, read!
There’s a wide variety to choose from; literary fiction, light reads, murder mystery, sci-fi, fantasy, comedy and non-fiction…certainly have got all the bases covered!

one of many...this one houses a lot of our discworld collection!

Hopefully this blog will be a record of my thoughts and feeling about the various reads and probably some reflections about the collected works of authors or various themes. It would be fun to document my ponderings on books I own, but also on books I borrow from the local library, especially as those are more “transient” books, and I may forget reading them if I don’t keep a record somewhere. Possibly some of my bookish friends will be willing to set pen to paper (as it were) and write a few posts now and then too!
Only time will tell, but I (like Dickens, ho ho!) have great expectations of myself as I set out on this endeavor.

Wish me luck! 🙂